Good Food Challenge Advisory Committee

 Abra Brynne is a nationally respected agriculture and food systems consultant. Abra has worked closely with farmers and on food systems for the past twenty-five years, with a priority on place-based food systems and the regulatory regimes that impede or support them. Abra has extensive experience with environmental and social standards as they relate to food production, both in the development and revision of standards as well as certification. She is a long-time and active volunteer with her local organic certification body and was the co-chair of the Standards Review Committee for the BC organic industry before the launch of the National Organic Program. Abra worked with the ISEAL Alliance for three years, during which time she undertook desk reviews of the accreditation procedures and policies against ISO standards for three leading international standards setters. She is a founding member and currently the Director of Engagement & Policy for the BC Food Systems Network, and the Co-ordinator of the Central Kootenay Food Policy Council.

Abra Brynne is a nationally respected agriculture and food systems consultant. Abra has worked closely with farmers and on food systems for the past twenty-five years, with a priority on place-based food systems and the regulatory regimes that impede or support them. Abra has extensive experience with environmental and social standards as they relate to food production, both in the development and revision of standards as well as certification. She is a long-time and active volunteer with her local organic certification body and was the co-chair of the Standards Review Committee for the BC organic industry before the launch of the National Organic Program. Abra worked with the ISEAL Alliance for three years, during which time she undertook desk reviews of the accreditation procedures and policies against ISO standards for three leading international standards setters. She is a founding member and currently the Director of Engagement & Policy for the BC Food Systems Network, and the Co-ordinator of the Central Kootenay Food Policy Council.

 Anelyse Weiler is a PhD Candidate in Sociology at the University of Toronto and a 2015 Scholar with the Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation. Her research focuses on immigration, the environment, and labour in the food system. She contributes to several organizations advancing food justice, including Justice for Migrant Workers. Twitter: @anelysemw

Anelyse Weiler is a PhD Candidate in Sociology at the University of Toronto and a 2015 Scholar with the Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation. Her research focuses on immigration, the environment, and labour in the food system. She contributes to several organizations advancing food justice, including Justice for Migrant Workers. Twitter: @anelysemw

 I am a PhD student in the Animal Welfare Program at the University of British Columbia. Originally, I'm from the Netherlands. My interest in animal welfare started at an early age. As a child, I was always questioning myself what the perfect life of my little rabbit Bennie would look like. From there, I started to wonder what was important for other animals to live a good life. Eager to learn more, I joined Wageningen University in the Netherlands, where I completed both a Bachelors (2013) and a Masters (2015). During my studies at Wageningen I was also able to complete a minor in Animal Welfare through a joint program offered with the University of Agricultural Sciences in Sweden. During my Masters I completed two research projects: the first on the effects of housing changes on the affective states of pigs and the second on the effects of regrouping on dairy cattle behaviour. This second project provided me the opportunity to visit the UBC Animal Welfare Program as a visiting scholar and to undertake research at the UBC Dairy Education and Research Centre. These experiences set the stage for my Ph.D. which will focus on dairy cattle welfare!

I am a PhD student in the Animal Welfare Program at the University of British Columbia. Originally, I'm from the Netherlands. My interest in animal welfare started at an early age. As a child, I was always questioning myself what the perfect life of my little rabbit Bennie would look like. From there, I started to wonder what was important for other animals to live a good life. Eager to learn more, I joined Wageningen University in the Netherlands, where I completed both a Bachelors (2013) and a Masters (2015). During my studies at Wageningen I was also able to complete a minor in Animal Welfare through a joint program offered with the University of Agricultural Sciences in Sweden. During my Masters I completed two research projects: the first on the effects of housing changes on the affective states of pigs and the second on the effects of regrouping on dairy cattle behaviour. This second project provided me the opportunity to visit the UBC Animal Welfare Program as a visiting scholar and to undertake research at the UBC Dairy Education and Research Centre. These experiences set the stage for my Ph.D. which will focus on dairy cattle welfare!

 Antonietta is a Red Seal Chef and Foodsafe Level One instructor. She is currently working towards a certificate in Food Security Studies through Ryerson University.

Antonietta is a Red Seal Chef and Foodsafe Level One instructor. She is currently working towards a certificate in Food Security Studies through Ryerson University.

Abra Brynne

Anelyse Weiler

Anne-Marike Smid

Antonietta Gesualdi

 
 Dr. Beth Ventura has had a lifelong-interest in improving the welfare of all animals. She holds a PhD from the University of British Columbia's Animal Welfare Program in the welfare of dairy cattle. Her research interests focus on understanding areas of overlap and disconnect between livestock industry stakeholders and the public, toward the end of identifying achievable policy solutions for the livestock industries that improve animal welfare. She now is an Assistant Professor of Teaching in Animal Behavior and Welfare at the University of Minnesota in the US. She can be contacted at bventura@umn.edu

Dr. Beth Ventura has had a lifelong-interest in improving the welfare of all animals. She holds a PhD from the University of British Columbia's Animal Welfare Program in the welfare of dairy cattle. Her research interests focus on understanding areas of overlap and disconnect between livestock industry stakeholders and the public, toward the end of identifying achievable policy solutions for the livestock industries that improve animal welfare. She now is an Assistant Professor of Teaching in Animal Behavior and Welfare at the University of Minnesota in the US. She can be contacted at bventura@umn.edu

 Byron Cruz is an organizer with Sanctuary Health Sanctuary, a grassroots community group. Sanctuary Health deploys direct action, movement-building, community-engagement, and direct support strategies to advocate for access to services for all regardless of immigration status or documentation.

Byron Cruz is an organizer with Sanctuary Health Sanctuary, a grassroots community group. Sanctuary Health deploys direct action, movement-building, community-engagement, and direct support strategies to advocate for access to services for all regardless of immigration status or documentation.

 Caroline Begg, PhD, is a Faculty Lecturer in the Department of Plant Science and Director of Internship (FMT). Dr Begg has worked in the field of sustainable agriculture in Tanzania and the Philippines. Her main interest is in ecological agriculture; other research interests include the relationships between spatial patterns of crop and soil parameters in agricultural fields. Dr Begg conducts research on food security on the island of Montreal and on ecological agriculture practices focusing on soil and crop management. Caroline teaches a number of courses both at the degree and the college level and supervises 10 to 15 undergraduate projects per year. She is the mentor to two Macdonald campus clubs; the Macdonald Student-Run Ecological Garden (MSEG), and the Farm-to- School Program. Both student groups have received the McGill Office for Sustainability Catalyst Award (2012 and 2014). Caroline is president of the Marché Ste Anne, a growing farmers market located in Ste-Anne- de- Bellevue. As well, she serves on the Board of Corbeille de Pain, a food security organization in the West Island and on the board of École-O- Champ , a science and agriculture educational non-profit for children of all ages. Caroline received the Principal’s Prize for Excellence in Teaching and the Macdonald Campus Award for Teaching Excellence in 2016, in 2013 the McGill Faculty Award for Excellence in Alumni Activities and in 2012 the McGill Office of Sustainability Award for Staff Contribution to Sustainability.

Caroline Begg, PhD, is a Faculty Lecturer in the Department of Plant Science and Director of Internship
(FMT). Dr Begg has worked in the field of sustainable agriculture in Tanzania and the Philippines. Her
main interest is in ecological agriculture; other research interests include the relationships between
spatial patterns of crop and soil parameters in agricultural fields. Dr Begg conducts research on food
security on the island of Montreal and on ecological agriculture practices focusing on soil and crop
management. Caroline teaches a number of courses both at the degree and the college level and
supervises 10 to 15 undergraduate projects per year. She is the mentor to two Macdonald campus
clubs; the Macdonald Student-Run Ecological Garden (MSEG), and the Farm-to- School Program. Both
student groups have received the McGill Office for Sustainability Catalyst Award (2012 and 2014).
Caroline is president of the Marché Ste Anne, a growing farmers market located in Ste-Anne- de-
Bellevue. As well, she serves on the Board of Corbeille de Pain, a food security organization in the West
Island and on the board of École-O- Champ , a science and agriculture educational non-profit for children
of all ages. Caroline received the Principal’s Prize for Excellence in Teaching and the Macdonald Campus
Award for Teaching Excellence in 2016, in 2013 the McGill Faculty Award for Excellence in Alumni
Activities and in 2012 the McGill Office of Sustainability Award for Staff Contribution to Sustainability.

 My research uses a food systems lens to better understand the importance of, and connections between social justice, ecological regeneration, regional economies and active democratic engagement. Working directly with a range of scholars and community-based practitioners across North America and Europe, I study the evolution of the broader collective of social movement networks which views the right to food as a central component of more sustainable futures.  Mobilizing existing partnerships, I integrate my research and teaching through community engaged learning pedagogies and support students, community partners and scholars to be actively involved in knowledge cogeneration. Through community-based, action-oriented inquiry and teaching and the development of placed-based action projects, my research contributes to critical discussions that inform theory, civil society action and public policy.  I have also been involved in community food security and food sovereignty efforts for over 15 years and have worked as a community-based researcher, operated an organic farm and led programming with non-profit organizations across Canada and in the Middle East.

My research uses a food systems lens to better understand the importance of, and connections between social justice, ecological regeneration, regional economies and active democratic engagement. Working directly with a range of scholars and community-based practitioners across North America and Europe, I study the evolution of the broader collective of social movement networks which views the right to food as a central component of more sustainable futures.

Mobilizing existing partnerships, I integrate my research and teaching through community engaged learning pedagogies and support students, community partners and scholars to be actively involved in knowledge cogeneration. Through community-based, action-oriented inquiry and teaching and the development of placed-based action projects, my research contributes to critical discussions that inform theory, civil society action and public policy.

I have also been involved in community food security and food sovereignty efforts for over 15 years and have worked as a community-based researcher, operated an organic farm and led programming with non-profit organizations across Canada and in the Middle East.

Beth Ventura

Byron Cruz

Caroline Begg

Charles Levkoe

 
 Memories of watching Jean-Jacques Cousteau documentaries and being fascinated by the animal kingdom at a young age shaped my adult life in unexpected ways.  Six year ago, my passion for anything sustainable led me to go back to school after a lifetime in the hospitality industry and graduated from BCIT in a new program: Sustainable Business Leadership.  One of my teacher had been the program director in Sweden in a Master's program that was cutting edge and different. This meeting inspired me to continue my education and graduated from BTH Master's in Strategic Leadership towards Sustainability in 2014.  Before leaving to study abroad, I had volunteered at Living Oceans Society and translated the entire web content of the organisation. During my Masters, I chose seafood certification specifically the Marine Stewardship Council for topic to work on combined with my experience in the food industry, the rest is history!  Currently completing a certificate in permaculture design.

Memories of watching Jean-Jacques Cousteau documentaries and being fascinated by the animal kingdom at a young age shaped my adult life in unexpected ways.  Six year ago, my passion for anything sustainable led me to go back to school after a lifetime in the hospitality industry and graduated from BCIT in a new program: Sustainable Business Leadership.  One of my teacher had been the program director in Sweden in a Master's program that was cutting edge and different. This meeting inspired me to continue my education and graduated from BTH Master's in Strategic Leadership towards Sustainability in 2014.  Before leaving to study abroad, I had volunteered at Living Oceans Society and translated the entire web content of the organisation. During my Masters, I chose seafood certification specifically the Marine Stewardship Council for topic to work on combined with my experience in the food industry, the rest is history!  Currently completing a certificate in permaculture design.

 Darren Vanstone works as a Corporate Engagement Advisor at World Animal Protection where he works with global food companies to improve the welfare of the animals in their supply chains.  Darren is a member of the National Farm Animal Care Council, a multi-stakeholder organization that produces the Canadian Codes of Practice for the care and handling of farm animals as well as members of the indicator committees for the Canadian and Global Roundtable for Sustainable Beef.  Prior to coming to World Animal Protection, Darren worked in senior positions in the grocery industry.

Darren Vanstone works as a Corporate Engagement Advisor at World Animal Protection where he works with global food companies to improve the welfare of the animals in their supply chains.  Darren is a member of the National Farm Animal Care Council, a multi-stakeholder organization that produces the Canadian Codes of Practice for the care and handling of farm animals as well as members of the indicator committees for the Canadian and Global Roundtable for Sustainable Beef.  Prior to coming to World Animal Protection, Darren worked in senior positions in the grocery industry.

 Dave started working in the food industry in 1985 after graduating with a Bachelor in Agriculture specializing in Food Science from the University of BC. Starting as a Quality Assurance technician with Mrs. Willman’s Baking, Dave steadily moved into roles of increased responsibility – his first managerial role with Gourmet Baker as QA Manager was the beginning of many other managerial positions with several other companies: Great Little Box Company (Operations Manager), Bread Garden/Creekside (General Manager), Premium Brands (Director Corporate Affairs), BC Dairy Association (CEO) and currently Naturally Splendid (CEO) represents Dave’s diverse and extensive experience in the food sector. The last two positions as CEO were opportunities to exercise exponential strategic changes and forge major shifts in organizational culture that were embraced by everyone. Concurrent to his roles in business Dave also participated in organizations that promote the food sector and mentor “up and coming’ leaders. The BC Food Processors Association represents over 500 members and Dave was Vice Chair and Chair for nine years. He participated on numerous governmental advisory committees such as the BC Food Safety Stakeholder group and Agri-food Advisory Council (hosted by Minister Norm Letnick) that introduced the provinces Agri-food and SeafooEvelyn Encalada Grez is a community-engaged scholar and decolonializing educator based in Ontario. Born in Chile during the military dictatorship, she was forced to migrate with her family and grew up with refugee-working class struggles in Canada. Her life experiences inform her political and academic work in critical development studies and in global justice movements. She holds a Masters Degree in Political Science and Latin American Studies from York University and also studied in Cuba at the Universidad de Oriente as part of her Bachelor of Arts Honours Degree and is currently in the final stage of her Ph.D. at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto in Social Justice Education. She has been organizing with migrant farmworkers and their families in rural Canada, Mexico and Guatemala for two decades and co-founded the award-winning collective, Justicia for Migrant Workers, J4MW. Evelyn has shared and mobilized her research and organizing work in venues such as the United Nations’ headquarters in New York, the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) and Parliament Hill in Ottawa. Her political work is featured in award-winning documentaries by Min Sook Lee, such as “El Contrato” and “Migrant Dreams”. Furthermore, Evelyn’s academic work on Mexican migrant workers has been published in “Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society” and “Citizenship Studies” among others. She teaches as an adjunct professor in the province of Ontario, mostly York University and also online for the University of British Columbia in issues pertaining to food justice, immigration policy, international development and equity and diversity. Evelyn's passions are community impact research and transformative education for action and global justice.d Growth Strategy in Nov 2015. Dave is also very honoured to be part of UBC’s Tri-mentoring program where he engages students in the faculty of Land and Food Systems and provides mentorship and coaching towards their graduation and entrance into the business world. At UBC, where efforts to build BC’s first Innovation Centre have begun, Dave serves as the Chair of the Value Chain Working Group – a collection of stakeholders committed to developing the operational plan of the centre. In June 2017, Dave joined the Canadian Centre of Food Integrity Board focussing to enhance the knowledge and understanding by Canadians, the importance of our food system.

Dave started working in the food industry in 1985 after graduating with a Bachelor in
Agriculture specializing in Food Science from the University of BC. Starting as a Quality
Assurance technician with Mrs. Willman’s Baking, Dave steadily moved into roles of increased
responsibility – his first managerial role with Gourmet Baker as QA Manager was the beginning
of many other managerial positions with several other companies: Great Little Box Company
(Operations Manager), Bread Garden/Creekside (General Manager), Premium Brands (Director
Corporate Affairs), BC Dairy Association (CEO) and currently Naturally Splendid (CEO)
represents Dave’s diverse and extensive experience in the food sector. The last two positions as
CEO were opportunities to exercise exponential strategic changes and forge major shifts in
organizational culture that were embraced by everyone.
Concurrent to his roles in business Dave also participated in organizations that promote the
food sector and mentor “up and coming’ leaders. The BC Food Processors Association
represents over 500 members and Dave was Vice Chair and Chair for nine years. He
participated on numerous governmental advisory committees such as the BC Food Safety
Stakeholder group and Agri-food Advisory Council (hosted by Minister Norm Letnick) that
introduced the provinces Agri-food and SeafooEvelyn Encalada Grez is a community-engaged scholar and decolonializing educator based in Ontario. Born in Chile during the military dictatorship, she was forced to migrate with her family and grew up with refugee-working class struggles in Canada. Her life experiences inform her political and academic work in critical development studies and in global justice movements. She holds a Masters Degree in Political Science and Latin American Studies from York University and also studied in Cuba at the Universidad de Oriente as part of her Bachelor of Arts Honours Degree and is currently in the final stage of her Ph.D. at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto in Social Justice Education. She has been organizing with migrant farmworkers and their families in rural Canada, Mexico and Guatemala for two decades and co-founded the award-winning collective, Justicia for Migrant Workers, J4MW. Evelyn has shared and mobilized her research and organizing work in venues such as the United Nations’ headquarters in New York, the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) and Parliament Hill in Ottawa. Her political work is featured in award-winning documentaries by Min Sook Lee, such as “El Contrato” and “Migrant Dreams”. Furthermore, Evelyn’s academic work on Mexican migrant workers has been published in “Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society” and “Citizenship Studies” among others. She teaches as an adjunct professor in the province of Ontario, mostly York University and also online for the University of British Columbia in issues pertaining to food justice, immigration policy, international development and equity and diversity. Evelyn's passions are community impact research and transformative education for action and global justice.d Growth Strategy in Nov 2015. Dave is also very
honoured to be part of UBC’s Tri-mentoring program where he engages students in the faculty
of Land and Food Systems and provides mentorship and coaching towards their graduation and
entrance into the business world. At UBC, where efforts to build BC’s first Innovation Centre
have begun, Dave serves as the Chair of the Value Chain Working Group – a collection of
stakeholders committed to developing the operational plan of the centre. In June 2017, Dave
joined the Canadian Centre of Food Integrity Board focussing to enhance the knowledge and
understanding by Canadians, the importance of our food system.

 If you’re looking for someone to thank for Choices’ consistently fresh, local organic produce, look no further than Dave Wilson. Born and raised in Vancouver, Dave began his journey with us on the floor of our Kitsilano store’s produce department in 1994 and has since worked his way to the position he holds today.  Through his thirty plus years in the retail produce industry, Dave has helped shape our core values and purchasing strategies as a company. Dave is the reason we believe in BC farmers first and ethical sourcing programs. This dedication to fair trade products has led to Choices Markets winning Fair Trade Canada’s National Retailer of the Year from 2010 to 2014. Dave’s also a member of the local food community as a volunteer with Fair Trade Vancouver, creator of the Pennies for Peru Flood Relief Program, a former council member of the Vancouver Food Policy Council and a former Steering Committee member of FarmFolk CityFolk.  Through Dave, we’ve pursued many active partnerships with small BC producers to form innovative programs to support the growth of our local industry. Dave has personally visited almost 100 local and international growing operations and frequently organizes farm tours for our store level management. These visits are essential for strengthening our relationships with the people who grow the food you choose to put on your plate.  When Dave has some time to relax, you’ll find him at his local community garden. You might say he has a bit of an obsession with fresh, local vegetables, but it’s hard to fault him on that.

If you’re looking for someone to thank for Choices’ consistently fresh, local organic produce, look no further than Dave Wilson. Born and raised in Vancouver, Dave began his journey with us on the floor of our Kitsilano store’s produce department in 1994 and has since worked his way to the position he holds today.

Through his thirty plus years in the retail produce industry, Dave has helped shape our core values and purchasing strategies as a company. Dave is the reason we believe in BC farmers first and ethical sourcing programs. This dedication to fair trade products has led to Choices Markets winning Fair Trade Canada’s National Retailer of the Year from 2010 to 2014. Dave’s also a member of the local food community as a volunteer with Fair Trade Vancouver, creator of the Pennies for Peru Flood Relief Program, a former council member of the Vancouver Food Policy Council and a former Steering Committee member of FarmFolk CityFolk.

Through Dave, we’ve pursued many active partnerships with small BC producers to form innovative programs to support the growth of our local industry. Dave has personally visited almost 100 local and international growing operations and frequently organizes farm tours for our store level management. These visits are essential for strengthening our relationships with the people who grow the food you choose to put on your plate.

When Dave has some time to relax, you’ll find him at his local community garden. You might say he has a bit of an obsession with fresh, local vegetables, but it’s hard to fault him on that.

Claude Tremblay

Darren Vanstone

Dave Eto

Dave Wilson

 
 Erin Akins is a Sustainability Coordinator at the University of Saskatchewan.  She works to integrate sustainability into campus operations by facilitating changes to activities, planning, and decision-making.  In support of sustainable food systems, she administers a student community garden program, led an inventory of food purchasing, coordinates a campus farmer’s market, supported a new food waste composting program and facilitated the creation of a rooftop garden farm to fork program.

Erin Akins is a Sustainability Coordinator at the University of Saskatchewan.  She works to integrate sustainability into campus operations by facilitating changes to activities, planning, and decision-making.  In support of sustainable food systems, she administers a student community garden program, led an inventory of food purchasing, coordinates a campus farmer’s market, supported a new food waste composting program and facilitated the creation of a rooftop garden farm to fork program.

 Eugénie Depatie-Pelletier works as Chief Executive Officer at MigrantWorkersRights, while in particular completing the doctoral program at the University of Montreal Faculty of Law. Since 2006, she conducted studies and collective discussions on immigration and migrant workers protection policies within academic circles, and worked as expert for the benefit of non‐governmental organisations, worker unions, Canadian and Chinese public agencies, as well as international organizations.

Eugénie Depatie-Pelletier works as Chief Executive Officer at MigrantWorkersRights, while in particular completing the doctoral program at the University of Montreal Faculty of Law. Since 2006, she conducted studies and collective discussions on immigration and migrant workers protection policies within academic circles, and worked as expert for the benefit of non‐governmental organisations, worker unions, Canadian and Chinese public agencies, as well as international organizations.

    Evelyn Encalada Grez is a community-engaged scholar and decolonializing educator based in Ontario. Born in Chile during the military dictatorship, she was forced to migrate with her family and grew up with refugee-working class struggles in Canada. Her life experiences inform her political and academic work in critical development studies and in global justice movements. She holds a Masters Degree in Political Science and Latin American Studies from York University and also studied in Cuba at the Universidad de Oriente as part of her Bachelor of Arts Honours Degree and is currently in the final stage of her Ph.D. at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto in Social Justice Education. She has been organizing with migrant farmworkers and their families in rural Canada, Mexico and Guatemala for two decades and co-founded the award-winning collective, Justicia for Migrant Workers, J4MW. Evelyn has shared and mobilized her research and organizing work in venues such as the United Nations’ headquarters in New York, the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) and Parliament Hill in Ottawa. Her political work is featured in award-winning documentaries by Min Sook Lee, such as “El Contrato” and “Migrant Dreams”. Furthermore, Evelyn’s academic work on Mexican migrant workers has been published in “Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society” and “Citizenship Studies” among others. She teaches as an adjunct professor in the province of Ontario, mostly York University and also online for the University of British Columbia in issues pertaining to food justice, immigration policy, international development and equity and diversity. Evelyn's passions are community impact research and transformative education for action and global justice.     

 

Evelyn Encalada Grez is a community-engaged scholar and decolonializing educator based in Ontario. Born in Chile during the military dictatorship, she was forced to migrate with her family and grew up with refugee-working class struggles in Canada. Her life experiences inform her political and academic work in critical development studies and in global justice movements. She holds a Masters Degree in Political Science and Latin American Studies from York University and also studied in Cuba at the Universidad de Oriente as part of her Bachelor of Arts Honours Degree and is currently in the final stage of her Ph.D. at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto in Social Justice Education. She has been organizing with migrant farmworkers and their families in rural Canada, Mexico and Guatemala for two decades and co-founded the award-winning collective, Justicia for Migrant Workers, J4MW. Evelyn has shared and mobilized her research and organizing work in venues such as the United Nations’ headquarters in New York, the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) and Parliament Hill in Ottawa. Her political work is featured in award-winning documentaries by Min Sook Lee, such as “El Contrato” and “Migrant Dreams”. Furthermore, Evelyn’s academic work on Mexican migrant workers has been published in “Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society” and “Citizenship Studies” among others. She teaches as an adjunct professor in the province of Ontario, mostly York University and also online for the University of British Columbia in issues pertaining to food justice, immigration policy, international development and equity and diversity. Evelyn's passions are community impact research and transformative education for action and global justice.  

 

 Deeply committed to ecological agriculture, seeds, and social justice, Genevieve's career has always focused on building a more resilient and sustainable food system. Since joining USC Canada in 2010, Genevieve has been working to support a shift towards agroecological practices, seed conservation and food sovereignty, both in Canada and internationally. Genevieve also co-manages  Our Little Farm , a certified organic vegetable farm in Quebec and works hard to make farming viable for farmers and good food accessible to all. She is past vice-president of Canadian Organic Growers and coordinated Equiterre's Farm-to-School program in Quebec (2007-2009).

Deeply committed to ecological agriculture, seeds, and social justice, Genevieve's career has always focused on building a more resilient and sustainable food system. Since joining USC Canada in 2010, Genevieve has been working to support a shift towards agroecological practices, seed conservation and food sovereignty, both in Canada and internationally. Genevieve also co-manages Our Little Farm, a certified organic vegetable farm in Quebec and works hard to make farming viable for farmers and good food accessible to all. She is past vice-president of Canadian Organic Growers and coordinated Equiterre's Farm-to-School program in Quebec (2007-2009).

Erin Akins

Eugénie Depatie-Pelletier

Evelyn Encalada

Genevieve Grossenbacher

 
 Geraldina Polanco is an Assistant Professor of Labour Studies and Sociology at McMaster University. Prior to joining McMaster, she was an Assistant Professor of Sociology and Legal Studies at the University of Waterloo, an Assistant Professor of Sociology at California State University Northridge, and a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council Postdoctoral Fellow at York University’s Centre for Research on Latin America and the Caribbean. She received her Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of British Columbia in 2014.   

Geraldina Polanco is an Assistant Professor of Labour Studies and Sociology at McMaster University. Prior to joining McMaster, she was an Assistant Professor of Sociology and Legal Studies at the University of Waterloo, an Assistant Professor of Sociology at California State University Northridge, and a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council Postdoctoral Fellow at York University’s Centre for Research on Latin America and the Caribbean. She received her Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of British Columbia in 2014.

 

 Hayley Lapalme is a systems thinker and facilitator who has spent six years working with institutions and municipalities to create more resilient food systems. She is the Nourish Program Designer and Facilitator with the J.W. McConnell Family Foundation. She has convened organic farmers in Barbados, social business leaders globally, and designed dozens of participatory workshops across Canada. Hayley has a head for complexity and leads with the aim for alignment between the things we believe and the things we practice. She holds a Master of Adult Education and Community Development from the University of Toronto

Hayley Lapalme is a systems thinker and facilitator who has spent six years working with institutions and municipalities to create more resilient food systems. She is the Nourish Program Designer and Facilitator with the J.W. McConnell Family Foundation. She has convened organic farmers in Barbados, social business leaders globally, and designed dozens of participatory workshops across Canada. Hayley has a head for complexity and leads with the aim for alignment between the things we believe and the things we practice. She holds a Master of Adult Education and Community Development from the University of Toronto

 Jennifer is a PhD candidate with the Centre for Sustainable Food Systems at Wilfrid Laurier University. Jennifer is a Registered Nurse with specializations in Cardiology and Infection Prevention and Control, and is now approaching health and well-being from a food systems perspective after a second undergraduate degree and a master’s degree in Geography and Environmental Management at the University of Waterloo. She has conducted research in Canada and in China on urban agriculture and gleaning as a form of food recovery that can contribute to community food security. Her current work is exploring the human-nature relationship through urban governance mechanisms and community-based participatory research for people and pollinator-friendly cities.

Jennifer is a PhD candidate with the Centre for Sustainable Food Systems at Wilfrid Laurier University. Jennifer is a Registered Nurse with specializations in Cardiology and Infection Prevention and Control, and is now approaching health and well-being from a food systems perspective after a second undergraduate degree and a master’s degree in Geography and Environmental Management at the University of Waterloo. She has conducted research in Canada and in China on urban agriculture and gleaning as a form of food recovery that can contribute to community food security. Her current work is exploring the human-nature relationship through urban governance mechanisms and community-based participatory research for people and pollinator-friendly cities.

 Jim McIsaac is the executive director of the TBuck Suzuki Foundation, a fisheries foundation created by fishermen 36 years ago to protect habitat, prevent pollution and promote sustainable fisheries.  His academic background is in math, physics and philosophy. Commercial fishing paid his way through university, which he continued after graduation, most notably in salmon, herring, and longline prawn.  He is the co-ordinator for the BC Commercial Fishing Caucus, a leadership group from the BC fishing industry focused on bringing independent fishermen's fishing interests into marine planning with First Nations and senior governments.    Jim is also the Pacific vice-president of the Canadian Independent Fish Harvester’s Federation, an organization built to protect independent harvester and coastal community commercial fishing interests. The Fed is made up of 31 fishing organizations representing over 12,000 of Canada’s 15,000 independent fishermen.  Over the decades he has participated in various fisheries research projects including: the EBM Roadmap, Local Catch - Core Values, Beyond the Economics: the Full Value of Fisheries to Community, and the Canadian Fisheries Research Network’s Comprehensive Fisheries Evaluation Framework.   

Jim McIsaac is the executive director of the TBuck Suzuki Foundation, a fisheries foundation created by fishermen 36 years ago to protect habitat, prevent pollution and promote sustainable fisheries.

His academic background is in math, physics and philosophy. Commercial fishing paid his way through university, which he continued after graduation, most notably in salmon, herring, and longline prawn.

He is the co-ordinator for the BC Commercial Fishing Caucus, a leadership group from the BC fishing industry focused on bringing independent fishermen's fishing interests into marine planning with First Nations and senior governments.  

Jim is also the Pacific vice-president of the Canadian Independent Fish Harvester’s Federation, an organization built to protect independent harvester and coastal community commercial fishing interests. The Fed is made up of 31 fishing organizations representing over 12,000 of Canada’s 15,000 independent fishermen.

Over the decades he has participated in various fisheries research projects including: the EBM Roadmap, Local Catch - Core Values, Beyond the Economics: the Full Value of Fisheries to Community, and the Canadian Fisheries Research Network’s Comprehensive Fisheries Evaluation Framework.

 

Geraldina Polanco

Hayley Lapalme

Jennifer Marshman

Jim McIsaac

 
 Joanne Bays is a population health nutritionist, a community developer, a public speaker with expertise in child nutrition, food policy and sustainable food systems. Joanne is well known within public health and sustainable food system sectors in Canada and internationally. Joanne co-founded and chaired HEALBC – Canada’s first northern food policy council. She co-founded BC Healthy Communities. She established and held the first provincial Farm to School position within Canada. She has overseen the establishment of hundreds of F2S programs across the nation. In 2011, she co-founded Farm to Cafeteria Canada (F2CC) – a pan-Canadian network championing activity to get more healthy, local, and sustainable foods into public institutions.

Joanne Bays is a population health nutritionist, a community developer, a public speaker with expertise in child nutrition, food policy and sustainable food systems. Joanne is well known within public health and sustainable food system sectors in Canada and internationally. Joanne co-founded and chaired HEALBC – Canada’s first northern food policy council. She co-founded BC Healthy Communities. She established and held the first provincial Farm to School position within Canada. She has overseen the establishment of hundreds of F2S programs across the nation. In 2011, she co-founded Farm to Cafeteria Canada (F2CC) – a pan-Canadian network championing activity to get more healthy, local, and sustainable foods into public institutions.

 Juneeja is the Co-Chair of Food Secure Canada Youth Caucus. She has her Masters in Science and Technology Policy from University of Edinburgh where her research focused on the dialogue around genetically modified food. Juneeja currently works with United Way Toronto & York Region, supporting local residents and stakeholders in collectively building strong neighbourhoods, with many focusing on community revitalization and local food security initiatives. She has also helped establish multi-stakeholder action groups including Malvern Food Security Table and is the co-founder of Scarborough Food Network. Juneeja was also previously involved with the Toronto Youth Food Policy Council as its Vice-Chair and Education Co-lead. She brings her passion for leveraging collective action to make the food system more inclusive and resilient.

Juneeja is the Co-Chair of Food Secure Canada Youth Caucus. She has her Masters in Science and Technology Policy from University of Edinburgh where her research focused on the dialogue around genetically modified food. Juneeja currently works with United Way Toronto & York Region, supporting local residents and stakeholders in collectively building strong neighbourhoods, with many focusing on community revitalization and local food security initiatives. She has also helped establish multi-stakeholder action groups including Malvern Food Security Table and is the co-founder of Scarborough Food Network. Juneeja was also previously involved with the Toronto Youth Food Policy Council as its Vice-Chair and Education Co-lead. She brings her passion for leveraging collective action to make the food system more inclusive and resilient.

 Justin has a passion for promoting local and sustainable food systems. He spent his master’s on ten organic farms across Canada and back, and the past four years connecting community-based fishermen with high value markets. He brings a specialization in creating transparent, traceable value chains that support small-scale low-impact producers.  Visiting his tiny off-grid cottage in a rocky fishing village on the Bay of Fundy since his youth, Justin has always had a deep connection to the sea.

Justin has a passion for promoting local and sustainable food systems. He spent his master’s on ten organic farms across Canada and back, and the past four years connecting community-based fishermen with high value markets. He brings a specialization in creating transparent, traceable value chains that support small-scale low-impact producers.  Visiting his tiny off-grid cottage in a rocky fishing village on the Bay of Fundy since his youth, Justin has always had a deep connection to the sea.

 Dr Kendra Strauss labour geographer and feminist political economist, and is Director of the Labour Studies Program at Simon Fraser University. She has teaching and research interests in the areas of labour market change, welfare regimes, and systems of regulation. Her past and current work focuses on occupational pensions; precarious work, migration and unfree labour; and on theorizing the relationships between production and social reproduction in contemporary capitalist economies. Her most recent book is Precarious Worlds: Contested Geographies of Social Reproduction, published by UGA Press.

Dr Kendra Strauss labour geographer and feminist political economist, and is Director of the Labour Studies Program at Simon Fraser University. She has teaching and research interests in the areas of labour market change, welfare regimes, and systems of regulation. Her past and current work focuses on occupational pensions; precarious work, migration and unfree labour; and on theorizing the relationships between production and social reproduction in contemporary capitalist economies. Her most recent book is Precarious Worlds: Contested Geographies of Social Reproduction, published by UGA Press.

Joanne Bays

Juneeja Varghese

Justin Cantafio

Kendra Strauss

 
 Kent Mullinix is Director- Institute for Sustainable Food Systems at Kwantlen Polytechnic University (KPU). Before joining KPU Mullinix held the Endowed Joint Chair in Pomology and was an Associate Professor, Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, Washington State University, and the Director of Agriculture Programs at Wenatchee Valley College. There he led the development of innovative and award winning undergraduate and technical agriculture education programs. Prior he was a fruit crops research specialist for the Universities of Missouri, Minnesota and Kentucky. His research and extension work now focuses on ecologically sound crop production, agriculture education programming, bioregional food systems, and family- based agriculture revitalization, all as foundational and integral to sustainable society. Additionally Mullinix conceived and led the development of the B.A.Sc. Sustainable Agriculture degree at KPU and is now closely involved in its implementation. He also led the conceptualization and implementation of the Richmond Farm School and Tsawwassen First Nation Farm School. Mullinix is an Adjunct Professor in The Faculty of Land and Food Systems at the University of British Columbia and Affiliate Faculty at Royal Roads University. He serves on the editorial board of the North American Colleges and Teachers of Agriculture Journal and is an advisor to the Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems and Community Development. Mullinix attended the University of Missouri where he earned a B.S. in Agriculture (major horticulture- fruit and vegetable production), M.S. in Horticulture (Pomology) and Ph.D. in Agriculture Education (curriculum and program development, crop sciences and soil conservation). He also earned a Ph.D. from the University of British Columbia in Plant Science (integrated pest management). He is a Professional Agrologist- British Columbia Institute of Agrologists. Mullinix has lived and worked on a diversified family farm in central Missouri, owned and operated (with his family for 15 years) a pear orchard on the eastern slopes of the Cascade Mountains, and for 14 years provided direct oversight for the planning, establishment and management of a 45 acre organically farmed apple, sweet cherry and peach teaching and demonstration orchard in north central Washington.

Kent Mullinix is Director- Institute for Sustainable Food Systems at Kwantlen
Polytechnic University (KPU). Before joining KPU Mullinix held the Endowed Joint
Chair in Pomology and was an Associate Professor, Department of Horticulture and
Landscape Architecture, Washington State University, and the Director of Agriculture
Programs at Wenatchee Valley College. There he led the development of innovative and
award winning undergraduate and technical agriculture education programs. Prior he was
a fruit crops research specialist for the Universities of Missouri, Minnesota and
Kentucky. His research and extension work now focuses on ecologically sound crop
production, agriculture education programming, bioregional food systems, and family-
based agriculture revitalization, all as foundational and integral to sustainable society.
Additionally Mullinix conceived and led the development of the B.A.Sc. Sustainable
Agriculture degree at KPU and is now closely involved in its implementation. He also led
the conceptualization and implementation of the Richmond Farm School and
Tsawwassen First Nation Farm School. Mullinix is an Adjunct Professor in The Faculty
of Land and Food Systems at the University of British Columbia and Affiliate Faculty at
Royal Roads University. He serves on the editorial board of the North American Colleges
and Teachers of Agriculture Journal and is an advisor to the Journal of Agriculture, Food
Systems and Community Development.
Mullinix attended the University of Missouri where he earned a B.S. in Agriculture
(major horticulture- fruit and vegetable production), M.S. in Horticulture (Pomology) and
Ph.D. in Agriculture Education (curriculum and program development, crop sciences and
soil conservation). He also earned a Ph.D. from the University of British Columbia in
Plant Science (integrated pest management). He is a Professional Agrologist- British
Columbia Institute of Agrologists.
Mullinix has lived and worked on a diversified family farm in central Missouri, owned
and operated (with his family for 15 years) a pear orchard on the eastern slopes of the
Cascade Mountains, and for 14 years provided direct oversight for the planning,
establishment and management of a 45 acre organically farmed apple, sweet cherry and
peach teaching and demonstration orchard in north central Washington.

 Kenton Harmer is the Director of Certification for the Equitable Food Initiative (EFI), a non-profit skill-building and certification organization that improves working conditions, pest management and food safety in the fresh produce industry. EFI works with major buyers, suppliers, workers and consumer groups to provide greater assurance regarding supply chain conditions, while generating measurable value for all stakeholders. Kenton directs the multi-stakeholder process responsible for the ecosystem of standards, polices and relationships that allows EFI to certify fresh produce farms for industry best practices.

Kenton Harmer is the Director of
Certification for the Equitable Food Initiative
(EFI), a non-profit skill-building and
certification organization that improves
working conditions, pest management and
food safety in the fresh produce industry.
EFI works with major buyers, suppliers,
workers and consumer groups to provide
greater assurance regarding supply chain
conditions, while generating measurable
value for all stakeholders. Kenton directs the
multi-stakeholder process responsible for
the ecosystem of standards, polices and
relationships that allows EFI to certify fresh
produce farms for industry best practices.

 Kevin Huang 黃儀軒 is the executive director of hua foundation, an organization with the mission of empowering youth in the Asian diaspora to fully participate in advancing social change through exploring racialized identities and building resilience in communities. His work has ranged from scaling culturally sensitive consumer-based conservation strategies through a project called Shark Truth, to advocating for Vancouver Chinatown’s and 'diverse' communities' food security, to building programs for youth to explore and reclaim their cultural identity on their own terms.     In addition to hua foundation, he sits on various committees and councils specializing in directing how institutions, organizations, and projects can shift their design to address racial, economic, and social inequalities in their work.     Kevin spends his free time exploring the intersectionality between food, culture, and identity. You tweet him @yskevinhuang.

Kevin Huang 黃儀軒 is the executive director of hua foundation, an organization with the mission of empowering youth in the Asian diaspora to fully participate in advancing social change through exploring racialized identities and building resilience in communities. His work has ranged from scaling culturally sensitive consumer-based conservation strategies through a project called Shark Truth, to advocating for Vancouver Chinatown’s and 'diverse' communities' food security, to building programs for youth to explore and reclaim their cultural identity on their own terms.

 

In addition to hua foundation, he sits on various committees and councils specializing in directing how institutions, organizations, and projects can shift their design to address racial, economic, and social inequalities in their work.

 

Kevin spends his free time exploring the intersectionality between food, culture, and identity. You tweet him @yskevinhuang.

 Ms. Cooper believes that everyone deserves to eat good food and that food is a tool to build community. She is a seasoned business and communications strategist with over a decade of experience in the advertising industry, where she worked with food brands such as Kraft Canada to develop the Hockeyville program, and Frito-Lay North America to launch their corporate sustainability platform. She also has experience in fundraising and event planning through her previous work with The Stop Community Food Centre in Toronto. Ms. Cooper is currently the Director of Strategy and Sustainability for Yorkshire Valley Farms, Canada's leading organic poultry producer.

Ms. Cooper believes that everyone deserves to eat good food and that food is a tool to build community. She is a seasoned business and communications strategist with over a decade of experience in the advertising industry, where she worked with food brands such as Kraft Canada to develop the Hockeyville program, and Frito-Lay North America to launch their corporate sustainability platform. She also has experience in fundraising and event planning through her previous work with The Stop Community Food Centre in Toronto. Ms. Cooper is currently the Director of Strategy and Sustainability for Yorkshire Valley Farms, Canada's leading organic poultry producer.

Kent Mullinux

Kenton Harmer

Kevin Huang

Krysten Cooper

 
 Liska Richer is the Manager of the UBC SEEDS (Social Ecological Economic Development Studies) Sustainability Program at the University of British Columbia (UBC) Vancouver Campus. Over the past 15 years, she has worked to integrate operational and academic efforts in sustainability through building strong and meaningful partnerships between faculty, operational clients, community partners, and students, resulting in over a thousand of innovative and impactful sustainability projects at UBC. She has engaged with 12 UBC campus faculties and schools to integrate applied sustainability projects into senior undergraduate and graduate courses. She has worked to develop strategies and action to achieve university and organization goals in environmental and social sustainability through committees and projects in 15 different research clusters ranging from zero waste, climate, energy, green buildings, land, biodiversity, materials, procurement, transportation, food systems, water, wellbeing, health and community. Liska has a background in sociology and food systems, and has specialized in institutional food system sustainability in her former roles as researcher, instructor, and graduate student at UBC. Liska values horizontal leadership, is committed to community-based action research, and is inspired by systems thinking, biodiversity, food systems, community and the movement to produce knowledge for a better world.

Liska Richer is the Manager of the UBC SEEDS (Social Ecological Economic Development Studies)
Sustainability Program at the University of British Columbia (UBC) Vancouver Campus. Over the past 15
years, she has worked to integrate operational and academic efforts in sustainability through building
strong and meaningful partnerships between faculty, operational clients, community partners, and
students, resulting in over a thousand of innovative and impactful sustainability projects at UBC. She has
engaged with 12 UBC campus faculties and schools to integrate applied sustainability projects into
senior undergraduate and graduate courses. She has worked to develop strategies and action to achieve
university and organization goals in environmental and social sustainability through committees and
projects in 15 different research clusters ranging from zero waste, climate, energy, green buildings, land,
biodiversity, materials, procurement, transportation, food systems, water, wellbeing, health and
community. Liska has a background in sociology and food systems, and has specialized in institutional
food system sustainability in her former roles as researcher, instructor, and graduate student at UBC.
Liska values horizontal leadership, is committed to community-based action research, and is inspired by
systems thinking, biodiversity, food systems, community and the movement to produce knowledge for a
better world.

 Lori Stahlbrand is a member of the Toronto Food Strategy team with the City of Toronto Department of Public Health, where she is responsible for the Toronto Food Policy Council. Prior to joining the City of Toronto, Lori was a lecturer in food studies at New College, University of Toronto, and coordinator of the College's Global Food Equity Initiative. She recently completed a PhD in Geography at Wilfrid Laurier University. Her research focused on the role of creative public procurement in promoting just and sustainable local food systems in Canada and the UK. As the founder and former president of the non-profit Local Food Plus, Lori promoted local and sustainable food procurement as a tool for social and economic development. Prior to engaging with food issues, Lori spent 15 years as a nationally-recognized journalist and broadcaster with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.

Lori Stahlbrand is a member of the Toronto Food Strategy team with the City of Toronto
Department of Public Health, where she is responsible for the Toronto Food Policy Council.
Prior to joining the City of Toronto, Lori was a lecturer in food studies at New College,
University of Toronto, and coordinator of the College's Global Food Equity Initiative. She
recently completed a PhD in Geography at Wilfrid Laurier University. Her research focused on
the role of creative public procurement in promoting just and sustainable local food systems in
Canada and the UK. As the founder and former president of the non-profit Local Food Plus, Lori
promoted local and sustainable food procurement as a tool for social and economic
development. Prior to engaging with food issues, Lori spent 15 years as a nationally-recognized
journalist and broadcaster with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.

 Marie-Claude Fortin, B.Sc (Agr.), M.Sc., Ph.D. is a Canadian agronomist, genomic research project manager and research scientist currently specializing in online course design and delivery, and community-based capstone project courses for undergraduate students. She teaches contemporary land and food issues using a systems approach which includes scientific information as well as ethical and social considerations.  She is using experiential learning in all her courses including community-based partnerships. She is a pioneer of experiential learning as a form of knowledge acquisition in online courses in Canada. As a former research scientist with Agriculture and Agriculture Canada, she is well known for her contributions to understanding how conservation tillage affects plant growth and development, soil physical properties and other field-based environmental processes. Early in her career, she recognized the importance of investigating plants and soils jointly to develop tools to alleviate environmental damage caused by modern agricultural practices. Her interest in managing problems via systems thinking led her to teaching courses in food systems sustainability at the University of British Columbia and managing multi-centre, multi-stakeholder genomic research projects.  She understands the importance of cooperation between university faculty and students, and community, industrial, academic and governmental organizations to advance novel ideas. Her current teaching interests focus on the use of project management tools for undergraduate team work, genomic advances in domestic plants and animals, food systems literacy and community-campus relationships. As a former Associate Editor and regular contributor to American peer-reviewed scientific journals and facilitator of multiple scientific research grant applications and reports, she emphasizes the importance of clear writing in her undergraduate courses. She participates regularly in campus-based initiatives for improving software tools for learning management and managing stakeholder relationships. She volunteers her time to help improve teaching and learning in the Faculty of Land and Food Systems and to take her students to sort food at the Greater Vancouver Food Bank.

Marie-Claude Fortin, B.Sc (Agr.), M.Sc., Ph.D. is a Canadian agronomist, genomic research project manager and research scientist currently specializing in online course design and delivery, and community-based capstone project courses for undergraduate students. She teaches contemporary land and food issues using a systems approach which includes scientific information as well as ethical and social considerations.  She is using experiential learning in all her courses including community-based partnerships. She is a pioneer of experiential learning as a form of knowledge acquisition in online courses in Canada. As a former research scientist with Agriculture and Agriculture Canada, she is well known for her contributions to understanding how conservation tillage affects plant growth and development, soil physical properties and other field-based environmental processes. Early in her career, she recognized the importance of investigating plants and soils jointly to develop tools to alleviate environmental damage caused by modern agricultural practices. Her interest in managing problems via systems thinking led her to teaching courses in food systems sustainability at the University of British Columbia and managing multi-centre, multi-stakeholder genomic research projects.  She understands the importance of cooperation between university faculty and students, and community, industrial, academic and governmental organizations to advance novel ideas. Her current teaching interests focus on the use of project management tools for undergraduate team work, genomic advances in domestic plants and animals, food systems literacy and community-campus relationships. As a former Associate Editor and regular contributor to American peer-reviewed scientific journals and facilitator of multiple scientific research grant applications and reports, she emphasizes the importance of clear writing in her undergraduate courses. She participates regularly in campus-based initiatives for improving software tools for learning management and managing stakeholder relationships. She volunteers her time to help improve teaching and learning in the Faculty of Land and Food Systems and to take her students to sort food at the Greater Vancouver Food Bank.

 Melana is Chair of the Toronto Youth Food Policy Council (TYFPC), and currently works in the office of City Councillor Joe Mihevc where she is the point person on food policy and poverty reduction issues. As such, she is an active advocate of increasing access to healthy, fresh, affordable food on student campuses- often touting "access is the first step to equity!". Melana is passionate about improved institutional procurement processes and bottom-up, citizen engagement food policy development, two issues she champions as a member of the Toronto Food Policy Council. She has an MA in Development Studies from York University, with a focus on Community Development, Agriculture and Community Health Systems, and has experience leading food security research, health promotion, and citizen engagement projects in Canada, Ecuador, Guyana, Guatemala, and Costa Rica. In her spare time, she provides strategic support as an Advisor and Board Member to a number of organizations working to create a more just, sustainable and locally grown food system.

Melana is Chair of the Toronto Youth Food Policy Council (TYFPC), and currently works in the office of City Councillor Joe Mihevc where she is the point person on food policy and poverty reduction issues. As such, she is an active advocate of increasing access to healthy, fresh, affordable food on student campuses- often touting "access is the first step to equity!". Melana is passionate about improved institutional procurement processes and bottom-up, citizen engagement food policy development, two issues she champions as a member of the Toronto Food Policy Council. She has an MA in Development Studies from York University, with a focus on Community Development, Agriculture and Community Health Systems, and has experience leading food security research, health promotion, and citizen engagement projects in Canada, Ecuador, Guyana, Guatemala, and Costa Rica. In her spare time, she provides strategic support as an Advisor and Board Member to a number of organizations working to create a more just, sustainable and locally grown food system.

Liska Richer

Lori Stahlbrand

Marie-Claude Fortin

Melana Roberts

 
 Melissa Baker, MHSc, RD is a Registered Dietitian and the Manager of Nutrition and Wellbeing with Student Housing and Hospitality Services at the University of British Columbia. She has a passion for health and wellbeing and strongly believes in promoting food choices that are healthful, sustainable, and delicious! Melissa works closely with the UBC Foodservices culinary team and the marketing and communications department to promote healthy eating and wellbeing amongst students living in residence. She currently sits on the Board of Directors for Dietitians of Canada and co-chairs the UBC Food and Nutrition Working Group, one of the five UBC Wellbeing priority areas.

Melissa Baker, MHSc, RD is a Registered Dietitian and the Manager of Nutrition and Wellbeing with Student Housing and Hospitality Services at the University of British Columbia. She has a passion for health and wellbeing and strongly believes in promoting food choices that are healthful, sustainable, and delicious! Melissa works closely with the UBC Foodservices culinary team and the marketing and communications department to promote healthy eating and wellbeing amongst students living in residence. She currently sits on the Board of Directors for Dietitians of Canada and co-chairs the UBC Food and Nutrition Working Group, one of the five UBC Wellbeing priority areas.

 Melissa is a human being with a passion for thinking, a fundamental belief in social and environmental justice, and a deep admiration for kind people. During the course of completing their MA in philosophy, they spent a great deal of time reflecting on the important ethical roles and responsibilities of NGOs while at the same time working and volunteering for a wide range of community organizations. After completing a program in social venture development and working as half of a freelance consulting team for non-profit and government organizations, Melissa signed on as the evaluation coordinator of Food Matters Manitoba after becoming enamoured with their mission of providing all people in Manitoba the opportunity to be able to eat good food.

Melissa is a human being with a passion for thinking, a fundamental belief in social and environmental justice, and a deep admiration for kind people. During the course of completing their MA in philosophy, they spent a great deal of time reflecting on the important ethical roles and responsibilities of NGOs while at the same time working and volunteering for a wide range of community organizations. After completing a program in social venture development and working as half of a freelance consulting team for non-profit and government organizations, Melissa signed on as the evaluation coordinator of Food Matters Manitoba after becoming enamoured with their mission of providing all people in Manitoba the opportunity to be able to eat good food.

 Michael Ekers is an Assistant Professor in Human Geography at the University of Toronto Scarborough and teaches classes on nature and society, environmental governance and the political economy of agriculture. Over the last five years he has worked with farmers and interns in accounting for the rise of new forms of work in the alternative agriculture sector and both the opportunities and challenges internships pose for farmers, workers and more generally for the future of the agriculture sector. Michael’s previous research focused on the cultural history of tree planting in Canada and accounted for the politics of everyday life and work in contemporary reforestation camps in British Columbia.

Michael Ekers is an Assistant Professor in Human Geography at the University of Toronto Scarborough and teaches classes on nature and society, environmental governance and the political economy of agriculture. Over the last five years he has worked with farmers and interns in accounting for the rise of new forms of work in the alternative agriculture sector and both the opportunities and challenges internships pose for farmers, workers and more generally for the future of the agriculture sector. Michael’s previous research focused on the cultural history of tree planting in Canada and accounted for the politics of everyday life and work in contemporary reforestation camps in British Columbia.

 Mike has returned to BC from Kentucky, where he spent 10 years at Kentucky State University (KSU), leading research, extension, and teaching programs related to organic agriculture, with an emphasis on small farms. Before going to Kentucky, he completed a PhD at West Virginia University, conducting companion planting research on a newly-certified organic farm. He grew up the son of a District Agriculturalist among the expansive grain farms of BC's Peace River region and earned degrees in plant science and agricultural pest management at UBC and SFU.  A passionate teacher, Mike helped launch a new Sustainable Agriculture degree program at the University of Kentucky in 2006; followed by a new Master of Science in Environmental Studies at KSU in 2010; and a new Bachelor of Agriculture, Food and Environment degree at KSU in 2012. In 2013 he was given his College’s Outstanding Teacher award and the USDA’s Honor Award for Excellence. He looks forward to applying this experience at KPU during the growth and development its new Sustainable Agriculture degree program.  Mike is very interested in the intersection between food and energy.He has explored energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions associated with farming and food systems, and experimented with renewable energy production techniques for small farms.

Mike has returned to BC from Kentucky, where he spent 10 years at Kentucky State University (KSU), leading research, extension, and teaching programs related to organic agriculture, with an emphasis on small farms. Before going to Kentucky, he completed a PhD at West Virginia University, conducting companion planting research on a newly-certified organic farm. He grew up the son of a District Agriculturalist among the expansive grain farms of BC's Peace River region and earned degrees in plant science and agricultural pest management at UBC and SFU.

A passionate teacher, Mike helped launch a new Sustainable Agriculture degree program at the University of Kentucky in 2006; followed by a new Master of Science in Environmental Studies at KSU in 2010; and a new Bachelor of Agriculture, Food and Environment degree at KSU in 2012. In 2013 he was given his College’s Outstanding Teacher award and the USDA’s Honor Award for Excellence. He looks forward to applying this experience at KPU during the growth and development its new Sustainable Agriculture degree program.

Mike is very interested in the intersection between food and energy.He has explored energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions associated with farming and food systems, and experimented with renewable energy production techniques for small farms.

Melissa Baker

Melissa Hiebert

Michael Ekers

Mike Bomford

 
 Nadia Lambek is an SJD candidate at the University of Toronto and a human rights lawyer focused on food system transitions and workers’ rights. Her current research explores efforts to institutionalize the right to food, the right to food sovereignty and peasants' rights.  She regularly collaborates with civil society groups on projects to build more equitable, just and sustainable food systems. Before her SJD, Nadia practiced union-side labour law and served as an advisor to United Nations Special Rapporteur on the right to food, Olivier De Schutter.  She is co-editor of Rethinking Food Systems: Structural Challenges, New Strategies and the Law (Springer 2014), is adjunct faculty at Vermont Law School and is co-organizer of the 2nd national food law and policy conference, Taking Stock: The State of Food Law and Policy in Canada.

Nadia Lambek is an SJD candidate at the University of Toronto and a human rights lawyer focused on food system transitions and workers’ rights. Her current research explores efforts to institutionalize the right to food, the right to food sovereignty and peasants' rights.  She regularly collaborates with civil society groups on projects to build more equitable, just and sustainable food systems. Before her SJD, Nadia practiced union-side labour law and served as an advisor to United Nations Special Rapporteur on the right to food, Olivier De Schutter.  She is co-editor of Rethinking Food Systems: Structural Challenges, New Strategies and the Law (Springer 2014), is adjunct faculty at Vermont Law School and is co-organizer of the 2nd national food law and policy conference, Taking Stock: The State of Food Law and Policy in Canada.

 Nicole Norris is a Registered Dietitian and local food advocate who has been working in the field of food security since 2014.  Nicole graduated with her MASc in Nutrition Communication at Ryerson University and is currently studying Community Support at George Brown College.  She has been published in Current Nutrition Reports for her review of the intersection between Diabetes and food insecurity. Her work has focused on engaging community members with healthy food and currently works with The Stop Community Food Centre advocating for local food systems, coordinating services and delivering nutrition programming.

Nicole Norris is a Registered Dietitian and local food advocate who has been working in the field of food security since 2014.  Nicole graduated with her MASc in Nutrition Communication at Ryerson University and is currently studying Community Support at George Brown College.  She has been published in Current Nutrition Reports for her review of the intersection between Diabetes and food insecurity. Her work has focused on engaging community members with healthy food and currently works with The Stop Community Food Centre advocating for local food systems, coordinating services and delivering nutrition programming.

 Robbie Silverman is a Senior Advisor in Oxfam America’s Private Sector Department, where he leads on both collaborating with and campaigning against for-profit corporations to advance Oxfam’s mission of combatting poverty and injustice worldwide.  In particular, he works on the strategy and implementation of Oxfam’s global “Even it Up” campaign against inequality, with a focus on stopping corporate tax avoidance. Prior to Oxfam, he spent several years working on affordable housing policy advocacy in the United States, including two years as a Skadden Legal Fellow in Chicago.  He holds a BA and MBA from Harvard and a JD from Yale.

Robbie Silverman is a Senior Advisor in Oxfam America’s Private Sector Department, where he leads on both collaborating with and campaigning against for-profit corporations to advance Oxfam’s mission of combatting poverty and injustice worldwide.  In particular, he works on the strategy and implementation of Oxfam’s global “Even it Up” campaign against inequality, with a focus on stopping corporate tax avoidance. Prior to Oxfam, he spent several years working on affordable housing policy advocacy in the United States, including two years as a Skadden Legal Fellow in Chicago.  He holds a BA and MBA from Harvard and a JD from Yale.

 Robyn Bunn is a member of Radical Action with Migrants in Agriculture, a grassroots collective that is committed to food justice, labour rights, migrant rights, and community re-organizing in support of migrant farmworkers in the Okanagan Valley, BC.

Robyn Bunn is a member of Radical Action with Migrants in Agriculture, a grassroots collective that is committed to food justice, labour rights, migrant rights, and community re-organizing in support of migrant farmworkers in the Okanagan Valley, BC.

Nadia Lambek

Nicole Norris

Robbie Silverman

Robyn Bunn

 
 My research focuses on creating a national food agriculture policy for Canada, and the set of coherent and comprehensive programs required to support such a policy. The courses I teach identity the problems of the food and agriculture system, its vulnerabilities, where change is possible in the short, medium and long term, an the strategies that could bring about effective change. Fes is well positioned to offer training in this area because of the inter-disciplinary of its offerings and faculty, and its emphasis on viable solutions to pressing environmental and social problems.

My research focuses on creating a national food agriculture policy for Canada, and the set of coherent and comprehensive programs required to support such a policy. The courses I teach identity the problems of the food and agriculture system, its vulnerabilities, where change is possible in the short, medium and long term, an the strategies that could bring about effective change. Fes is well positioned to offer training in this area because of the inter-disciplinary of its offerings and faculty, and its emphasis on viable solutions to pressing environmental and social problems.

 Samantha Gambling is a Community Animator and Project Manager, involved in a number of food and housing related projects across the Vancouver Area. She's a graduate of the UBC Farm Practicum in Sustainable Agriculture and recently completed her Master's degree from UBC's Faculty of Land and Food Systems, where she studied food sovereignty and agricultural policy in the BC dairy industry. Today she works for two local non-profits: Farm to School Vancouver Area Regional Hub, and Small Housing BC. She's co-founder of the BC Tiny House Collective, and is a member of the North Shore Table Matters Network and Community Housing Action Committee.

Samantha Gambling is a Community Animator and Project Manager, involved in a number of food and housing related projects across the Vancouver Area. She's a graduate of the UBC Farm Practicum in Sustainable Agriculture and recently completed her Master's degree from UBC's Faculty of Land and Food Systems, where she studied food sovereignty and agricultural policy in the BC dairy industry. Today she works for two local non-profits: Farm to School Vancouver Area Regional Hub, and Small Housing BC. She's co-founder of the BC Tiny House Collective, and is a member of the North Shore Table Matters Network and Community Housing Action Committee.

 Sarah Bakker is the General Manager of the National Farmers Union-Ontario and the Vice-chair of the Organic Council of Ontario. She has 18 years of experience in marketing and fundraising in the non-profit sector and has previously served on the Board of the West End Food Co-op. In 2008, she and her husband founded Field Sparrow Farms, located on 100 acres in Bobcaygeon, ON. Currently, they market grass-fed beef, pastured pork, and pastured chicken via retail stores, food co-ops, and farmers’ markets.

Sarah Bakker is the General Manager of the National Farmers Union-Ontario and the Vice-chair of the Organic Council of Ontario. She has 18 years of experience in marketing and fundraising in the non-profit sector and has previously served on the Board of the West End Food Co-op. In 2008, she and her husband founded Field Sparrow Farms, located on 100 acres in Bobcaygeon, ON. Currently, they market grass-fed beef, pastured pork, and pastured chicken via retail stores, food co-ops, and farmers’ markets.

 Sean is the founder and Executive Director of the Canadian Fair Trade Network (CFTN). Sean’s passion for global sustainability, grew out of international travel (2004-2009) and time spent working in Kenya. Sean moved back to Vancouver in 2009, and got involved with Fair Trade Vancouver, helping the city become Canada’s 11th Fair Trade Designated Town. Sean later became the organizations Executive Director, where his work included working with the University of British Columbia and Simon Fraser University in their becoming Canada’s 1st and 2nd Fair Trade Designated Campuses. In 2011, Sean founded the Canadian Fair Trade Network, as an effort to build a stronger, more organized social movement in Canada. Sean has overseen the expansion of numerous programs, has led five national conferences, and developed and grown the organizations bi-annual publication, Fair Trade Magazine. Sean represents Canada on the International Fair Trade Towns Committee, sits on the Trade 4 Sustainable Development Stakeholder Advisory Committee, and the Good Food Challenge Advisory Committee.

Sean is the founder and Executive Director of the Canadian Fair Trade Network (CFTN). Sean’s passion for global sustainability, grew out of international travel (2004-2009) and time spent working in Kenya. Sean moved back to Vancouver in 2009, and got involved with Fair Trade Vancouver, helping the city become Canada’s 11th Fair Trade Designated Town. Sean later became the organizations Executive Director, where his work included working with the University of British Columbia and Simon Fraser University in their becoming Canada’s 1st and 2nd Fair Trade Designated Campuses. In 2011, Sean founded the Canadian Fair Trade Network, as an effort to build a stronger, more organized social movement in Canada. Sean has overseen the expansion of numerous programs, has led five national conferences, and developed and grown the organizations bi-annual publication, Fair Trade Magazine. Sean represents Canada on the International Fair Trade Towns Committee, sits on the Trade 4 Sustainable Development Stakeholder Advisory Committee, and the Good Food Challenge Advisory Committee.

Rod McRae

Samantha Gambling

Sarah Bakker

Sean McHugh

 
 Susanna grew up in Saskatchewan, where a deep appreciation of food and agriculture was first fostered by her parents and grandparents. After spending some time volunteering and working on various farms both locally and internationally, Susanna decided to build on her B.Sc. in Environmental and Agricultural Sciences with a Masters in Land and Food Systems from UBC. She has since enjoyed learning how to conduct research and teach about food systems, exploring topics such as local food systems, food sovereignty, food security, agricultural resilience and socio-ecological sustainability, with a focus on the Canadian context. After about a year working on climate adaptation with the B.C. Ministry of Agriculture, and subsequently the  B.C. Agriculture and Food Climate Action Initiative , Susanna is excited to return to research as a PhD student at the Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability at UBC. She is passionate about conducting research to inform food systems change, and is looking forward to learning more about how to translate that research into policy and institutional change. In her spare time, Susanna enjoys cooking and fermenting things, like sourdough bread and kimchi.

Susanna grew up in Saskatchewan, where a deep appreciation of food and agriculture was first fostered by her parents and grandparents. After spending some time volunteering and working on various farms both locally and internationally, Susanna decided to build on her B.Sc. in Environmental and Agricultural Sciences with a Masters in Land and Food Systems from UBC. She has since enjoyed learning how to conduct research and teach about food systems, exploring topics such as local food systems, food sovereignty, food security, agricultural resilience and socio-ecological sustainability, with a focus on the Canadian context. After about a year working on climate adaptation with the B.C. Ministry of Agriculture, and subsequently the B.C. Agriculture and Food Climate Action Initiative, Susanna is excited to return to research as a PhD student at the Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability at UBC. She is passionate about conducting research to inform food systems change, and is looking forward to learning more about how to translate that research into policy and institutional change. In her spare time, Susanna enjoys cooking and fermenting things, like sourdough bread and kimchi.

 Torrye lives on Vancouver Island and works for the Canadian Fair Trade Network as their Fair Trade Programs Coordinator. In 2012, she started working as a Campus Food Strategy Coordinator with Meal Exchange leading social justice projects in northern British Columbia focused around waste reduction, food security, and local and sustainable food procurement. Torrye first joined the fair trade movement when she helped the University of Northern British Columbia secure its Fair Trade Campus Designation in 2015. She holds a bachelor’s degree in Biomedical Studies from the University of Northern British Columbia and looks forward to continuing to take an active role in creating a just and sustainable food system through her postgraduate work, education, and interests.

Torrye lives on Vancouver Island and works for the Canadian Fair Trade Network as their Fair Trade Programs Coordinator. In 2012, she started working as a Campus Food Strategy Coordinator with Meal Exchange leading social justice projects in northern British Columbia focused around waste reduction, food security, and local and sustainable food procurement. Torrye first joined the fair trade movement when she helped the University of Northern British Columbia secure its Fair Trade Campus Designation in 2015. She holds a bachelor’s degree in Biomedical Studies from the University of Northern British Columbia and looks forward to continuing to take an active role in creating a just and sustainable food system through her postgraduate work, education, and interests.

 

Susanna Klassen

Torrye McKenzie